Archive | January, 2013

Jet Magazine – September 25, 1952

20 Jan

I can’t say that I am surprised that the Black schools were closed so that the children could help pick cotton.

Jet Magazine September 25, 1952

Jet Magazine September 25, 1952

More telling is the line describing the schools that stayed open because those children’s parents were involved in industry, business, or domestic work jobs.

A few of the schools that would have closed are

Booker T. Washington High School

Melrose High School

Manassas High School

Douglass High School

I hope to find more documentation of the other Blacks schools of this time that would have closed due to King Cotton.

 

– Tiffany

Soruce: Jet Magazine September 25, 1952

Jet Magazine – August 27, 1964

20 Jan

I hesitated before posting this particular clipping, but decided to anyway since it can be found in Jet Magazine. I couldn’t help but to giggle at the fact that Jet Magazine used to publish gossip.

Jet Magazine August 27, 1964

Jet Magazine August 27, 1964

I have an idea who this is about,  but I really wonder if they ever discovered that their gossip made it into Jet Magazine.

 

– Tiffany
– Source: Jet Magazine August 27, 1964

Genealogy Assistance – Alex Haley Museum Henning, TN

20 Jan

Over the weekend I had the pleasure of going to a genealogy session at the Alex Haley Museum and Interpretive Center. While I was there I met the director of the museum, Paula Lee Bogar, and the museum’s genealogy specialist Dr. Pam Sirmans. While there I got the opportunity to discuss my family history with Dr. Sirmans. Dr. Sirmans and her assistant are at the museum on certain Saturdays to assist those who would like genealogy help free of charge. If you would like to visit, please call the Alex Haley Museum and Interpretive Center and schedule an appointment. Each appointment is an hour long. While you’re there take a tour of the museum and visit the gift shop to show support.

Alex Haley Museum and Interpretive Center
200 S. Church Street Henning, TN
731-738-2240

www.alexhaleymuseum.com

 

– Tiffany

Dr. C.D. Coleman – Jet Magazine Oct 28, 1954

6 Jan
Jet Magazine October 28, 1954

Jet Magazine October 28, 1954

While reviewing old issues of Jet Magazine I came across an entry for Dr. C.D. Coleman. In October of 1954 he was elected as Notary of Lauderdale County, TN. I looked Dr. Coleman up on Ancestry.com and discovered that he was born in 1883 in Mississippi. His full name was Charles David Coleman. His mother, Francis, was born into slavery in 1852 in Alabama. Dr. Coleman worked as a physician and owned his own practice. He was married to Gertrude Love Coleman on September 30, 1915 in Lauderdale County, TN. According to information found on Ancestry.com Dr. Coleman passed away March 10, 1966. It’s unclear how he ended up in Halls, but I personally am glad he chose Halls and chose to break racial barriers in Lauderdale County by becoming an elected official.

 

– Tiffany

– Jet Magazine October 28, 1954

Newspaper Clippings – Haywood County Elected Officials

6 Jan

I came across this article about two African Americans being elected to office in Haywood County, TN. I was drawn to this article because Haywood County in the 1960s had a lot of racial tensions related to African Americans being allowed to vote.

The Gadsden Times August 5, 1966

The Gadsden Times August 5, 1966

Land owners in Haywood County had been forcing African Americans who attempted to register to vote off of their sharecropping farms. Many of those forced off of their farms ended up living in “Tent Cities”. In 1962 50 land owners in Haywood County settled out of court for violating the 1957 Civil Rights Acts because of their roles in voter intimidation among other things. These landowners had been using economic pressure to prevent African Americans from registering to vote. Under the 1962 settlements these landowners agreed not to interfere with African Americans who attempted to register to vote.

 

-Tiffany

-Source: The Gasden Times August 5, 1966 edition

TWB – Traveling While Black – Follow Up

3 Jan

In my last post title Traveling While Black a reader left a comment asking if any of the businesses featured in the Negro Motorists Green Book were still around. Being a lifelong Memphian the only business listed there that I still knew of was the Lorraine Motel which is now the National Civil Rights Museum. From this point I started putting the addresses of these businesses in Google Maps to see if any of the buildings were still around. I did discover that the Mrs. E.M. Wright’s Tourist Home located at 896 Polk Avenue in Memphis in the 1956 Green Book is still standing. I decided against posting a picture of it, but you can easily find a picture of it through Google Maps. According to property records the home at that address was built in 1913 and it has 4 bedrooms, so Mrs. E. M. Wright had plenty of space to rent out. While it is no longer Mrs. E.M. Wright’s Tourist Home it is home to another Memphis family. I wonder if this family has any idea what their home used to be.

Negro Motorist Green Book 1956

Negro Motorist Green Book 1956

– Tiffany

Watch Night/Emancipation Day

1 Jan

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation which freed slaves in all southern states in rebellion. Many slaves had heard about this law that was to become legal and many stayed up anticipating the moment that they would become free. As I reflect on what this means for slaves in the south I think of my children’s ancestors who were enslaved in Lauderdale County, TN on the plantation of David Gilliland. I think of what they must have been thinking when this date came to pass. I am also very proud of them. Through researching David Gilliland I discovered that all of his slaves had runaway by 1864 when he had written his will. I have since discovered that one of his slaves, Major Gilliland/Gilden/Bates, went on the join the United States Colored Troops to fight against slavery. I like to imagine that on this day they celebrated their independence. I like to imagine that even if they were unable to leave the plantation on this exact date that they knew that they would eventually be free. Here are a few mentions of runaway slaves found in the Memphis Commercial Appeal. I hope that they too eventually got their freedom.  

Memphis Commercial Appeal Jan 1, 1857

Memphis Commercial Appeal Jan 1, 1857

Memphis Commercial Appeal Jan 1, 1857

Memphis Commercial Appeal Jan 1, 1857

– Tiffany

Source: Memphis Commercial Appeal January 1, 1857 edition